Good Ol’ Texas Chili

Dec 30, 11 Good Ol’ Texas Chili

By Amanda Hill

We Texans love our chili. Everyone’s recipe is a little different—whether you make it with extra jalapenos, beans, no beans, thick, thin, venison or lean beef. It’s the perfect dinner option for a cold winter night.

At Texas Farm Bureau, we have an annual chili lunch, hosted by the Commodity and Regulatory Activities Division, to show our appreciation to the more than 300 employees who donate through our United Way campaign. It’s something we all look forward to time and again.

Ned Meister and his team use the Texas Beef Council’s Perini Ranch Steakhouse Chili recipe, and then each add a little twist to spice it up.

Texas chili prep

Coleburn Davis stirs up some of the “Jay & Coleburn’s Wimpy Chili”—for those who skip the kick.

Gentlemen's Chili

Always the gentleman, Gene Richardson prepares “Gene & George’s Gentlemen’s Chili” for a “less potent” option (no beans). If you’re looking for trouble, though, you could try “Jon’s Rocket Fuel.”

Ned's Nuclear Waste

And for the adventurous folk, Ned tests his famous “Ned’s Nuclear Waste.” To make the peppers really pop, he freezes the jalapenos for an entire year. That stuff will knock you clear into 2012!

Texas chili

If you’re looking for a quick, healthy meal to serve your family in the new year, try your own version of the Texas Beef Council’s chili recipe. It’s sure to please any Texan!

From all of us at Texas Table Top, Happy New Year and enjoy!

 

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Amanda Hill

Associate Editor of Publications
Texas Farm Bureau
Amanda Hill aspires to be as good a cook as her momma and grandmothers, but she still has a long way to go. All attempts—good and bad—are tested by her patient and kind husband, who rarely gives a negative review. Contact Amanda at ahill@txfb.org or follow Amanda on Twitter.

2 Comments

  1. rl reeves jr /

    Here at the scrumptious house we make lots of chili. Generally we make a TRUE Texas Red. Here’s the recipe

    1/4 lb Fat[ I use clarified bacon fat but beef suet would be more traditional ]

    5 lbs Beef Tips [Chuck Roast cut into cubes is best but you may use the product labeled beef tips in the market]

    1/2 Cup Chili Powder[Gebhardt is king in Texas but if you can’t find it use common sense and buy a good brand. Preferably from a market that sells a fair amount of it so it’s fresh. If you have access to a genuine Mexican market then you can find the really good stuff and get a pure chile powder like Guajillo]

    2 T. Cumin[I like to buy the seeds,toast them on a comal,then grind them in a spice grinder but powdered cumin will work just fine

    2 T. Ground Oregano aka Mexican Oregano[Not the Italian kind, this Oregano is sold as a powder and is essential in this dish]

    1 T. Salt or to taste

    1 T. Cayenne [obviously if you’d like to ratchet up the heat just add more]

    1 bulb Garlic [Freshly minced garlic,not the stuff that sits in a jar of oil in your fridge]

    2 quarts Stock[I use chicken which is not traditional, beef is recommended here for purists. If you don’t have time to make stock the brand Better Than Bouillion is surprisingly good]

    1/2 Cup Masa Harina [If you can’t find masa mix in your part of the country, corn meal will do just fine-the finer grind the better]

    1/2 Cup Water

    Technique:

    *Heat fat til it shimmers

    *Brown beef thoroughly

    *Add seasonings and simmer two to three hours or til meat can be easily cut with edge of fork

    *Defat

    *Add stock,bring to boil,

    *Add slurry of masa mix/water

    *Simmer 30 minutes

    * Adjust flavors

    and the back story with cooking notes
    http://www.scrumptiouschef.com/food/index.cfm/2009/11/18/How-To-Make-Authentic-Texas-Red-Chili?adminview=true

    bon appetit y’all
    RL Reeves Jr

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